The Tremayne Collection

A showcase of the annual Tremayne Art Prize. 

We are pleased to present Phase 1 of the collection, documenting artworks from 2000 to 2017. Phase 2, showcasing artworks from 1987 to 1999, will be available shortly. 

The Tremayne Collection

The Tremayne Collection is a gift to the School from the Tremayne Club – a special group of Old Girls who left Collegiate fifty or more years ago. Each year, an artwork created by a Year 11 or 12 student is selected. The artist receives the Tremayne Prize at Speech Night and, in turn, the work is given to the School where it is hung or placed for all to appreciate.

The Tremayne Prize has been awarded since 1987. The winning works are displayed across Collegiate’s Middle and Senior School campuses; in Davies, Tremayne, Stephenville, Chambers, Jerusalem, Cananore, Founder’s Hall and the McNeill Performing Arts Centre.

Many past Tremayne Prize winners have gone on to distinguished careers in the Arts. Recipients have forged successful pathways in graphic design, teaching, music, fine arts, business, arts communication and marketing. Collegiate is delighted to have provided such a strong foundation from which these women have flourished.

This gallery is a celebration of the winning artworks and includes a profile of each Tremayne Art Prize recipient. Click the images below to access more information.

Phase 1 of this collection features works from 2000 to 2017. Phase 2, showcasing artworks from 1987 to 1999, will be available shortly.

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    Diana Ellinger (née Johnston)

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2000

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    Sam Dobie (née Buxton)

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2001

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    Sally Ramsey (née Hales)

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2002

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    Alison Cowles

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2003

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    Amy Jackett (née Tritton)

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2004

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    Angela Nichols (née Claridge)

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2005

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    Sarah Sansom

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2006

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    Emma Gott

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2007

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    Eloise Cook

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2008

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    Adele Drury

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2009

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    Emma Hughes

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2010

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    Elizabeth Boon

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2011

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    Isabella Farrell-Hallegraeff

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2012

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    Lauren Jones

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2013

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    Maggie Bones

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2014

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    Dasha Margvelashvili

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2015

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    Zoe Hansen

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2016

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    Alexandra Taylor

    Tremayne Art Prize - 2017

Diana Ellinger (née Johnston)

Tremayne Art Prize - 2000

My happiest days at School were spent toiling away in the art rooms, and this, as well as encouragement from fantastic art teachers and artsy older sisters means that my career thus far has taken some happy creative turns. After finishing school in 2001, I studied Communication Design at RMIT University and since then I’ve worked as a designer for a handful of small design studios in Melbourne and most recently for the Parliamentary Education Office in Parliament House, and for the Australian Electoral Commission, in Canberra. In 2009 I completed a Graduate Diploma in Visual Arts in the Painting workshop at the Australian National University, which means I now refer to myself as an emerging practising artist. Right now I squeeze freelance design jobs around caring for my two young daughters while dreaming about becoming a serious painter. An insight into my creative work can be found at my website www.dianaellinger.com or by following me on Instagram @dianaellinger. 

Sam Dobie (née Buxton)

Tremayne Art Prize - 2001

As a young girl who had the fortune of attending Collegiate, I was exposed to many potential career pathways, but none held more appeal than a career that was creative. Under the guidance of Leigh Steven, who as well as being my teacher became a mentor, I managed to mould my passion into a very fulfilling career. 

By the end of Year 12, I was on my way to a degree in Visual Communication at RMIT in Melbourne. This, in turn, led to me finding my niche as an Art Director in creative advertising. After six years in Melbourne, I returned to Tasmania to take up a position at what was then Clemenger Tasmania. I have since had the opportunity to lecture and act as the Tasmanian Principal for AWARD School – a 13-week intensive creative thinking course run around the country. I am also currently the Chair of the Tasmanian Diemen Awards, which recognizes and awards excellence in the creative industries of Design, Digital, Advertising and Printing.

Whilst I never set out to foster creative thinking and practices, I have over the years developed a desire for making sure that creativity is nurtured for as long as possible in as many people as possible. All children excel at creativity – it is only as they grow older that this can be stifled. I truly believe that Tasmania due to its unique position in the world is the perfect environment to celebrate and foster our creative thinkers.

Studying art and design has amongst many things taught me that it is creativity that makes the world turn. It is so much more than just pretty pictures. Creative thinking is what drives inventions and discoveries, advances in science, and breakthroughs in medicine. There are so many industries that would stagnate if it wasn’t for the creative thinkers of the world.

When I won the Tremayne prize it was not as an art student, I was a graphic design student – the first I believe to do so. What this taught me, and I hope teaches everyone, is that every time you manage to change the status quo you are opening doors not just for yourself, but everyone. 

Sally Ramsey (née Hales)

Tremayne Art Prize - 2002

CFP®, BBus, BEc, GDipAppFin

I am a Certified Financial Planner ® who completed a Bachelor of Business and a Bachelor of Economics at the University of Tasmania who lives in Blackmans Bay, Tasmania with her young family.

I work for Tasplan Super, helping Tasmanians optimise their retirement savings. Having previously worked as a financial planner, I now focus on developing and implementing operational improvements to Tasmania’s largest superannuation fund. 

Studying Art taught me to think outside the square; to see problems as opportunities for improvement. Mistakes are just a chance to try to do better next time. I use this creative mindset to deliver innovative business solutions in a dynamic operating environment.

I am a Board member of Kingston Beach Early Learning Centre, and has Chaired the Hobart Organising Committee for the Mother’s Day Classic which raises funds for breast cancer research. I am also involved in Women In Super, a national advocacy and networking group that aims to improve women’s access to superannuation.

Alison Cowles

Tremayne Art Prize - 2003

After graduating from Collegiate in 2003, I completed a Bachelor of Business and Bachelor of Economics from the University of Tasmania in 2008. I then moved to Melbourne to pursue a career in Marketing. After several years working in consumer goods, I returned to university in 2015 to complete a Master of Business Administration at Melbourne Business School, undertaking an international exchange at Duke University – Fuqua School of Business in North Carolina, USA.

Currently, I am a Product Manager at World Vision Australia and am responsible for the Community Sponsorship and Thematic Portfolio. Creativity in marketing goes beyond advertising campaigns and can simply mean solving a problem in a new and innovative way. Studying Art at Collegiate helped me develop a creative and flexible mindset that allowed me to embrace uncertainty and complexity wherever it may arise.

Amy Jackett (née Tritton)

Tremayne Art Prize - 2004

I have always loved art and have focused on art throughout my career. After Collegiate, I completed a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts at the University of Tasmania with first-class honours. I then went on to complete a PhD in Art Theory, also at the University of Tasmania. Throughout my PhD candidature, I did sessional lecturing and tutoring at the Tasmanian College of the Arts. I found this incredibly rewarding and decided I’d like to pursue a career as a lecturer.

Shortly after graduating with my PhD, I moved up north to take up the position of Lecturer in Visual Arts at Charles Darwin University. In Darwin, I found a passion for curating. In 2015, I co-curated the exhibition Counting Timelines for the Darwin Festival. In 2016, I was involved in another Darwin Festival event, this time as a writer and artist, in an exhibition called Waiting for Water which was shown in Darwin, Alice Springs and Tasmania. I am now back home in Hobart curating Australia’s newest major art award, the Hadley’s Art Prize for contemporary Australian landscape art. I feel privileged to have a job which enables me to share my passion for art with others.

Angela Nichols (née Claridge)

Tremayne Art Prize - 2005

Sarah Sansom

Tremayne Art Prize - 2006

After being presented with the Tremayne Prize in 2006 and topping the state for Art Production in Year 11, Sarah was also awarded the Kingborough Council’s  Abel Tasman Art Prize for tertiary students. Her winning work was an abstract landscape influenced by her many summer holidays spent at the Bay of Fires. This award allowed her to travel to the Netherlands where she lived for some months visiting art galleries and institutions and nurturing her interest in art and curating.

After finishing at Collegiate, Sarah was accepted to RMIT, Melbourne, to study Fine Arts, majoring in Painting. She was headhunted back to Tasmania in 2013 to take on the position of Manager at ‘Handmark’ in Salamanca – a renowned art gallery specialising in works by Tasmanian artists where she had worked during her last years of School. Her love and admiration for Tasmania with its unique landscape and light, along with the close-knit community of artists and the blossoming art culture, made it an easy decision to come back to live in Hobart.

Her motivation comes from her involvement in the arts community, working with and advising artists, curating frequent exhibitions, and developing her natural rapport with local customers. In addition, Sarah has developed a rapport with interested art collectors from all over the world, who see Hobart as a thriving art mecca. She continues to travel, recently returning from New York and, last year, Art Basel in Hong Kong and the Affordable Art Fair in Singapore. Earlier this month she returned from Sydney Contemporary where Handmark exhibited. She is inspired by her love of learning, travel and experiencing other cultures. 

Emma Gott

Tremayne Art Prize - 2007

During my 15 years at Collegiate, I was fortunate to be taught art by Mr Leigh Stevens and later, Ms Louise Bloomfield. Both were teaching rockstars, the equivalent to Stevie Nicks and Mick Jagger in the eyes of a 15-year-old student. 

Their classes were a breath of fresh air, an outlet and space to grow, where we were taught to solve problems creatively – pushing through until a solution was found.

I didn’t have a ten-year plan at School, or clear direction on where life would lead post Collegiate – something that didn’t sit well with me when I graduated.  

Ten years later, I am living in Sydney working as a VIP manager at EVH PR – Australia’s leading luxury communication and events agency. My job takes me all over the world where I get to meet a host of interesting people, working with incredible local and international brands. 

I use creative problem solving every single day at work, whether it be developing new event concepts, executing client briefs or styling celebrities, a skill honed in the art studios at Collegiate.

What have I learned? Ten-year plans have no basis in reality, nor do clear-cut pathways and that is ok! Challenges will pop up along the way, so the best you can do is persevere until you reach a solution. This is a mindset I learned all those years ago studying art at Collegiate and will continue to use into the future.

Eloise Cook

Tremayne Art Prize - 2008

Following Collegiate, I went on to study Communication Design (graphic design) at RMIT University, graduating in 2012. I then returned to Hobart to begin working as a freelance illustrator/designer, taking up a studio residency at Salamanca Art Centre.

I studied art at Collegiate in both Years 11 and 12 and it had a huge impact on my professional direction. Art at Collegiate, for me, was a meaningful and personal exploration into understanding the purpose of the subject. I learnt to trust my intuition and ask myself what it was I was trying to say and why. Unlike any other subject, it taught me to think differently.

Authenticity was nurtured without pressure or expectation to deliver any particular visual outcome. Since venturing out solo, I have worked for clients such as the National Australia Bank and the Cotton On Group whilst building a greeting card design business that currently sells in stores all over Australia. 

Adele Drury

Tremayne Art Prize - 2009

During my final pre-tertiary years at Collegiate, I undertook every creative subject that I could possibly incorporate into my study. From early high school I had a fairly clear understanding of where I wanted to go. I’d wanted to study architecture for as long as I could remember and pursuing something creatively driven was always a given for me.

I studied Art Production in Year 11, which formed the basis for the more advanced counterpart, Art Studio Practice the following year – a more specialised subject where I could refine my individual practice and understanding even further. I learnt a lot about the areas of design that I was most passionate about and wanted to investigate further, through having the opportunity to explore this, primarily through Art Production and then more specifically in Studio Practice.

The Arts not only set me in good stead for pursuing my chosen career path but also helped to shape my knowledge and understanding in many areas of design and culture, which were and still are fundamentally important to my ongoing growth in the design industry and future career pathways.

Both my experiences and results achieved in my art study granted me a place at RMIT University to study architecture and has contributed to my understanding of arts and spaces, in which both I have undertaken studies and work in since graduating.

Emma Hughes

Tremayne Art Prize - 2010

I always enjoyed studying art at Collegiate, particularly in my middle and senior years of my schooling.

It was in Art Production that I learned that art could be self-directed and involved experimentation and creative thinking in your area of interest or medium. I liked the independence of making decisions around my art whilst being supported and pushed by my teachers.

The influence that art had on my chosen career path would be the recognition that I wanted to do something that demanded a creative and innovative mindset. In choosing to become a primary school teacher, I had a limited understanding that this job would challenge me to make these sorts of decisions every day. I am continually looking for creative, innovative ways for my students to learn and present their new understandings. Perhaps, they are in the position that I found myself in at Collegiate some years ago – making artistic choices in an experimental but supported environment.

Studying Art has had a large influence on my career choice!

Elizabeth Boon

Tremayne Art Prize - 2011

During my time at St Michael’s Collegiate, art was always a key component in my education. It has provided me with a basis for my creative development as an art practitioner today, and has continued to be central to my pathway after my graduation in 2012.

I moved to Melbourne in 2014 to study a Bachelor of Interior Design at RMIT University.  After completing a year and a half of this degree, I transferred to Monash University to study the Bachelor of Art History and Curatorship, which I am currently completing. Here, I am part of a dynamic art community, where I have had opportunities to take a curatorial role within exhibitions and student-run initiatives working with peers from the Fine Arts faculty. I hope to complete further post-graduate study in curatorial practice in the coming years. I currently volunteer at an artist-run initiative, Bus Projects, in Collingwood and the exhibition space at RMIT Design Hub.

My art education at Collegiate has proved an invaluable foundation for my own practice within art making, curatorship and writing. Collegiate’s generous resources, facilities and studio space enabled me to develop and experiment with creative practices while providing footing for the processes and possibilities for independent and collaborative art making and theory, influencing my ambition to have a career within the art industry. 

Isabella Farrell-Hallegraeff

Tremayne Art Prize - 2012

Ever since I was a young girl, any spare minute I had I would pick up my pencils and draw. Waiting for my Dad to drive me to School, before I went to sleep at night, over a bowl of porridge in the morning, I filled hundreds of note pages and sketch books with familiar faces, strange worlds, planets, birds, plants and fish.

TCE Art at Collegiate is a time I look back on very fondly. Constantly challenged and inspired, it was a space where I cultivated my creativity amongst the support of friends and of course, Ms Bloomfield. I was able to explore broadly with material and idea and eventually produce a large body of polished work which I was, and still am, proud of.

I finished Collegiate in 2013 and took a year off to travel and volunteer; spending time in Canada and the Netherlands with family and exploring other parts of Europe independently. During the last five months of 2014, I lived in Northern Vietnam volunteering as an English teacher for a vocational college of tourism, a time of both difficulty and immense reward. While I was travelling, the sketchbooks continued. Particularly while I was in Vietnam, my writing and art was something I would do every day to keep me grounded.

I was always torn with the decision of whether to enrol in art school and pursue my creative passions or follow my strong desire for academic learning. I started a Bachelor of Arts at the University of Melbourne in 2015, attending one of the residential colleges – Queen’s. Firstly, I pursued subjects in art history and media communications with dreams of becoming an art curator. However, since the first year, my degree has taken a spontaneous and complete turn.  This year I will graduate with a double major in International Politics and Criminology, aspiring to be a Human Rights advocate and work for foreign aid development.

I find my study very rewarding and am currently on exchange at the University of Amsterdam. Nevertheless, I seldom leave the house without a sketchbook and pencil in my pocket or bag.

Although my career has drifted from the art world, my desire to create and engage with art will never disappear. I know it is something I can always count on being there for me just like it did in those long challenging months in Vietnam. 

Just recently I have begun my own Instagram page (@bell_arts) and post almost daily pictures of my watercolour sketches. I aim to soon sell prints and cards online and maybe eventually create a website. Keep an eye out for it!

Lauren Jones

Tremayne Art Prize - 2013

Studying art at Collegiate allowed me to realise that my creativity was capable of changing the world, and I would never be satisfied if it remained a hobby. In an environment where studies of Law, STEM and Economics were being pushed – all fantastic areas for women to be working in – studying art confirmed what I already knew: I can create more powerful change in the world by doing something that I’m truly passionate about.

After finishing School, I enrolled in and have now almost completed, a combined BA/BFA, majoring in Psychology and Visual Communication. At this time I started freelancing as a designer and illustrator, which has grown into a neat little business over the past three years. I’ve been privileged enough to work with a whole range of sole operators and help get their businesses off the ground, as well as a number of well-established companies and not-for-profits.

Now I’m working as a Graduate Designer at a creative design agency. I’m especially excited about this as I’m working alongside extraordinarily skilled designers and have learnt so much from them already!

Maggie Bones

Tremayne Art Prize - 2014

I am currently studying a Bachelor of Politics and Criminology at the University of Melbourne. Whilst this degree is fulfilling and enriching in its own way, I have terribly missed the incorporation of art into my everyday learning experience. I sought to do something about this in my current and final year of my undergraduate degree by enrolling in elective creative writing classes.

Creative writing classes have given me the tools to curate beautiful pieces of work that are an expression of meaning, emotion and reflection. Whilst not a visual form of art, I have found many parallels between the short stories and the paintings that I have created through school and beyond. I expressed my passion for painting through a poem I submitted last semester, which was inspired by my experiences of painting at Collegiate in year eleven and twelve. It begins,

“Prickly legs stick hot to the blue plastic

Of the classroom chair

And my hands shake

From too much black coffee

I need to vomit.

I need to paint.

To squish oil-crayon colours

Onto my fingertips…”

Whilst I have not painted or created as much visual art as I would have hoped since leaving Collegiate (largely due to limited space and a small budget conducive to being a poor uni student) the passion that I developed for art at schools still burns strong. I have plans to continue creative writing and redevelop my painting skills when I take my ‘art gap year’ in 2018.

Art, in whatever form, functions as an outlet for me to express my thoughts, anxieties, passions and desires. It is absolutely crucial that I find time to be creative every day, to keep me grounded and inspired, and I urge everyone else to do the same.

Dasha Margvelashvili

Tremayne Art Prize - 2015

I graduated Collegiate in 2016 and partook in the School’s art programs throughout both Years 11 and 12. Artistic expression requires an amalgamation of creativity, patience and processes of self-reflection. Through the creation of art, all three of these traits are challenged and therefore developed within an individual, and I am no exception to this.

During my studies, this year I have often used skills that I developed throughout Years 11 and 12 art practice. I am thankful for how flexible the conceptual art process is in its applicability to a variety of life situations.   

Zoe Hansen

Tremayne Art Prize - 2016

I have been studying art throughout my many years. I have developed to be a creative person looking at tasks with a new viewpoint on how to evolve them from a creative perspective. Without studying Art, I would not have the skills and mindset to take on this different approach having a brighter outlook. In the future, I am looking to pursue a career in the media industry, particularly television and film. The study of Art will certainly help along this pathway and in developing my innovative mindset.

Alexandra Taylor

Tremayne Art Prize - 2017

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